Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

Melody was an excellent resource when I was going through a particularly difficult time in my life:  the loss of my mother and the break up of an longtime friendship.  Not only was she a sympathetic ear and gave me insight into the grieving process and how to handle major changes, she provided concrete practical information and advice.  I would highly recommend her services. 

- J.A., Researcher

LATEST POSTS

  1. Break Any Bad Habit Using This Science-Backed Approach

    It’s 3 p.m., and you’re knee-deep in an afternoon energy slump.

    You head towards the office kitchen to grab a glass of water where you’re encountered by a box of treats that seems to be calling your name. “Just one,” you swear. But that’s the third time you’ve given in to your sweet tooth this week.

    As a smart, ambitious person, you know bad habits keep you from reaching your goals. You know you’re capable of self-control. Yet, despite your best efforts, you’ve been unable to change.

    Whether it’s mid-day snacking, procrastinating, or skipping workouts, feeling powerless in the face of bad habits can really take a toll on your motivation, even your self-esteem.

    What if it’s not a lack of willpower that’s to blame? What if the advice you’ve been given about how to “break” a bad habit is actually misguided?

    If you’ve been trying different methods over and over again but nothing’s working, it’s time for a new approach that leverages the science of behavior change.

    The Psychology of Bad Habits

    You can spend hours researching life hacks. However, if you don’t first understand the psychology driving habits, you’ll never see any real success.

    When you break it down, habits are comprised of three distinct stages:

    1. Cue

    2. Routine

    3. Reward

    In the mid-day munchies example, the cue is fatigue. This triggers a routine: getting up and heading to the kitchen. The reward? Yummy goodness that gives you a temporary energy boost.

    READ MORE
  2. How to Respond When A Co-Worker Takes Credit for Your Work

    You’re sitting in a meeting and a co-worker takes credit for your idea. Or maybe you stay late to finish a project, but your name is left off of the final presentation. Your boss grabs the limelight and accepts all the praise.

    Even if you work in a company that encourages collaboration, some people still go too far and inappropriately monopolize work as their own, never crediting others.

    It’s infuriating when someone blatantly rips off your ideas. It feels wrong. Unfair. You want justice and may even feel a little victimized.

    How should you handle these situations? You may be torn between a desire to seek revenge and letting it go altogether. Should you jump in as soon as possible to reclaim your project? Or retreat and hope it’s a one-time thing?

    Whether intentional or an honest oversight, colleagues may take credit where it isn’t due. Here are seven tips to respond like a professional

    1. Tune into your reaction, then mine those emotions in positive ways.

    You care about your job, so when someone steals your idea it’s natural to be upset. There’s no right or wrong way to feel. In fact, your emotions may sway from disgust to defeat.

    The first step is to notice what what arises for you. Developing the self-awareness to deal with the emotions that come up and act on them constructively is key. This might mean taking time to calm down, perhaps by channeling your anger into a sweat-breaking workout.

    READ MORE
Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career