Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

Melody cuts through BS and gets to the heart of the issues tugging at you. She offers real, actionable solutions and results. For any young woman entrepreneur looking to find her way, Melody can be your compass.

- P.M., Magazine Executive

LATEST POSTS

  1. Try This Mind Trick To Deal With Annoying Co-Workers

    At some point in your career, you’ll undoubtedly cross paths with colleagues that irk you. Maybe it’s the presumption that their opinions are the only correct ones on the planet or their blatant brown-nosing to get on the boss’ good side. Perhaps you can’t stand how their arrogance, moodiness or quick temper puts a damper on the company culture.

    Difficult co-workers can high-jack your emotions. They trigger something in you that causes you to almost act or think irrationally , which is not exactly a healthy situation in which you can succeed. You may find that sooner or later your exasperation expands until every little thing that person does makes you want to tear your hair out.

    Unfortunately, in the case of annoying co-workers, you can’t simply remove them from your life. Avoiding them around the office or circumventing one-on-one meetings probably won’t work either.

    Fortunately, there’s a way to put a positive spin on the situation that stems from a counter-intuitive insight about dealing with difficult people. When we discern a quality in someone else that irks us, we can benefit from pausing to examine exactly why we have that reaction and look more closely at what it can teach us about ourselves.

    The friction of interacting with an annoying co-worker actually presents a chance to cultivate essential leadership skills like assertiveness, self-awareness and confidence. It can provide an unexpected opportunity for personal growth that goes far beyond solely testing the limits of your patience.

    READ MORE
  2. How to Manage Your Friends (Without Making It Awkward)

    When you’re a fast-rising millennial stepping into a managerial role for the first time, there’s certainly a lot to think about. You’ve probably wondered if your older colleagues will consider you experienced enough.

    Or maybe you’ve thought about how the shift in responsibility will affect your work-life balance.

    But many new managers have a worry that’s seldom addressed, even though it’s widespread: how to navigate managing peers and friends.

    What should you do when people who have always been your equals are now reporting to you?

    This transition can be awkward and anxiety-provoking to say the least, yet typical advice for new managers tends to gloss over how to manage the social and emotional changes.

    Here are some practical tips to help you successfully ease the stress, lead with confidence and keep your relationships intact even as they evolve and change.

    1. Realize having friends at work is still a good thing.

    You’ve probably come across management advice warning you how employees need a leader, not a friend. As a new manager, your first impulse might be to put on your manager hat and cut off any friendly ties.

    The truth is, cutting off these friendships is not only unnecessary but can actually have a negative impact on your work and your organization.

    Research has shown the powerful benefits of having friends at work. People who have friends at work are not only more engaged, but their organizations are more profitable than those in which close friendships are less common.

    READ MORE
Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career