Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

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As a result of working with Melody, I got promoted to a role that delights me. I’m now more motivated to pursue what I want and have developed a stronger belief in myself, my abilities, and my work. Melody provides highly actionable advice that aligns precisely with what I’m trying to achieve. In working together, I have deepened knowledge of my strengths and weaknesses, achieved many wins and opportunities, and learned long-term strategies for career growth. I’d recommend Melody to any young professional woman, who like me, needs the mindset and tools to help them get to where they want to be.

- V.L., Marketing Executive

LATEST POSTS

  1. FREE WORKBOOK: Change Negative Thoughts That Limit Your Success

    Why do some of the most intelligent people sabotage their own success? It all goes back to unconscious every day thoughts, also called cognitive distortions, first identified by psychologist Aaron Beck and Dr. David Burns.

    It’s typical to fall into these irrational thoughts every now and then. Mindset missteps are common among even the brightest, most well-meaning people. We can all relate to that feeling of sometimes getting in our own way.  It’s simply part of being human, an evolutionary response designed to keep you safe and protected.

    Nevertheless, irrational thoughts can get in your way of success and taking necessary, healthy risks. For example, your inner critic may tell you you’re not good enough and that you’ll most definitely fail. Cognitive distortions also complicate our relationships. You project that your boss is upset when you make a mistake or worry about how your friends and family perceive you.

    The good news is that you can develop the necessary self-awareness to spot and change irrational thoughts. With a little discipline, you can retrain your thinking. You can gradually modify your self-talk to be more balanced, resilient, and supportive to help you reach your goals and tackle the toughest situations. Recognizing unhelpful thoughts as illogical and impermanent is an important first step to letting go of the stress they bring:

    Here’s a look at the most common cognitive distortions defined by Burns, along with examples of ways it may pop up in your life and work. 

    READ MORE
  2. 5 Signs You’re Making The Wrong Career Move

    Most of the choices we make every day are simple and straight-forward: what to wear to work, what to eat for lunch, whether to go to sleep at a reasonable hour or stay up watching Netflix. They don’t cause much stress or inner conflict.

    Career transition points, on the other hand, can leave you feeling significantly more stuck—especially when you’re facing a big, life-changing decisions.

    Should you take that promotion? Move to a different city? Transition to a new industry? Launch a business or take your side hustle full-time?

    Decision-making is tough, particularly when there may not be one “right” answer. Despite your best efforts, it’s not always clear what to do next. How do you know whether you’re heading in the right direction, or about to make a bad career move you’ll regret?

    Here are five tell-tale signs you’re about to make a career misstep–and how to get back on track to finding work you love.

    1. You have a sense of foreboding.

    Just about everyone has experienced a feeling that something is “off” or a sense of dread they can’t shake. Does that sensation creep up when you think about the new opportunity?

    Maybe you didn’t feel much of a connection with the new team you’d potentially be working with when you met them. Or perhaps you’re starting to worry about relocation costs and not as willing to take a pay cut as you first thought.

    Although most of us come equipped with a sense of intuition when something doesn’t feel right, we also have plenty of ways to rationalize these feelings away and ultimately discount them. 

    READ MORE
Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career