Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

When I began working with Melody, I was at a crossroads personally and professionally. I was struggling with low self-confidence and had many fears holding me back at work and in my relationships. Working with Melody helped me learn how to stop internalizing negative feelings and how to stop comparing myself to others. Melody helped me push beyond a series of losses (a difficult break up and a job loss) to come out stronger on the other side. The result: I felt more in control of my life, began to speak up, be more assertive, and value myself in relationships. I highly recommend Melody for anyone who feels lost or confused on their current path.

- L.A., Fashion Designer

LATEST POSTS

  1. BIG NEWS: I’m giving a TEDx Talk!

    I’m thrilled to finally announce some big news…

    I’m giving a TEDx talk!

    Speaking at a TED event has been a dream of mine for a long time. I’m even more excited for the opportunity to give voice to a silent struggle I see so many of my readers and the women I work with battle every. single. day.

    Here’s more about the counter-intuitive – and somewhat controversial – idea I’ll be sharing, plus how you can get in on the fun.

    You can purchase tickets and learn more about the event here: melodywilding.com/tedxbergencommunitycollege

    This is a message that’s close to my heart and one I’m adamant about spreading. Thank you to the organizers for selecting me and to everyone who encouraged me to pursue this opportunity. I’m forever grateful for your support and would be honored for you to take this ride with me.

    Journeying to the TEDx stage has already been a growth experience in so many unexpected ways — from learning how to apply the psychology of storytelling to craft my talk, to asking for help and feedback, and also greeting old, fear-based stories and limiting beliefs coming up.

    My hope is that getting real about what I’m going through and giving you a glimpse inside the process (hint: it’s far from perfect) will give you the courage to take more risks and make things happen in your own life. I’m practicing using my voice in new and more vulnerable ways, and all I ask for is that you give yourself permission to do the same.

    READ MORE
  2. Come From a ‘Dysfunctional’ Family? You’d Make a Great Entrepreneur

    We’re living in a golden age of entrepreneurship.

    There’s never been a more favorable time for founders, freelancers and members of the side-hustle generation seeking to define success on their own terms.

    Look around and you’ll find no shortage of inspirational figures leading the way. They are today’s visionaries, including self-made women who have built history-making brands with genius, guts and grit such as Meg Whitman, Sara Blakely and Arianna Huffington to name a few. They’re the founders of game-changing companies that have revolutionized our culture, technology and economy–from SpaceX, 23andMe, Zipcar, Uber, Amazon and countless others.  The list grows longer every day.

    But what of their paths to greatness? Are there traits successful entrepreneurs share?

    How Great Entrepreneurs Face Adversity: Dysfunctional Family Theory

    We know that it takes more than a great idea to launch a business. But what gives some smart, ambitious trailblazers the edge above others?

    Lean Startup pioneer and Stanford professor Steve Blank has a theory that it lies in their psychological makeup. After decades in Silicon Valley watching companies come and go, he observed that great startup CEOs seemed to have similiar personality traits, including passion, tenacity and a remarkable comfort operating in chaos.

    Blank and his venture capital colleagues noted another peculiar pattern–that a disproportionate number of founders came from dysfunctional families. In his ideas on “dysfunctional family theory” first articulated in 2009, Blank posits that many (not all) entrepreneurs come from a less than white-picket-fence, Brady-Bunch-esque upbringing.

    READ MORE
Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career