Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

Working with Melody has been a revelation I didn’t know I was waiting for. Everything felt beyond my control leaving me trapped and stuck, and no matter who I reached out to, I never quite felt understood. Even just a few minutes in, Melody’s clear understanding and empathy was such an unbelievable relief — someone got what was happening and that my feelings and reactions were entirely normal. There’s not enough space in the world to go into what a difference just a few weeks have made – restoring control and balance in my life – but I will not ever forget that first five minutes.

- M.W., Editor at World's Largest Publishing Company

LATEST POSTS

  1. 5 Signs You’re Making The Wrong Career Move

    Most of the choices we make every day are simple and straight-forward: what to wear to work, what to eat for lunch, whether to go to sleep at a reasonable hour or stay up watching Netflix. They don’t cause much stress or inner conflict.

    Career transition points, on the other hand, can leave you feeling significantly more stuck—especially when you’re facing a big, life-changing decisions.

    Should you take that promotion? Move to a different city? Transition to a new industry? Launch a business or take your side hustle full-time?

    Decision-making is tough, particularly when there may not be one “right” answer. Despite your best efforts, it’s not always clear what to do next. How do you know whether you’re heading in the right direction, or about to make a bad career move you’ll regret?

    Here are five tell-tale signs you’re about to make a career misstep–and how to get back on track to finding work you love.

    1. You have a sense of foreboding.

    Just about everyone has experienced a feeling that something is “off” or a sense of dread they can’t shake. Does that sensation creep up when you think about the new opportunity?

    Maybe you didn’t feel much of a connection with the new team you’d potentially be working with when you met them. Or perhaps you’re starting to worry about relocation costs and not as willing to take a pay cut as you first thought.

    Although most of us come equipped with a sense of intuition when something doesn’t feel right, we also have plenty of ways to rationalize these feelings away and ultimately discount them. 

    READ MORE
  2. Train Your Brain to Be More Positive — Here’s How

    The entrepreneurs I work with tend to have a few things in common: they are smart, ambitious, and highly motivated. Most of them are also stressed to the max.

    From the outside, they appear powerful and poised. But on the inside, they worry about their ability to deal with the demands that come along with having a successful career.

    If you’re a top-performer, you can probably relate. In fact, statistics show pressure at work is the leading source of chronic stress among American adults. Having confidence in your ability to conquer challenges is essential to thriving in today’s business world.

    The good news is that this brand of mental resiliency can be cultivated with practice.

    The Power of Explanatory Style

    Each of us has our own explanatory style–a way we explain why good or bad things happen.

    Research by positive psychology expert Martin Seligman finds that people generally fall into two categories:

    1. Entrepreneurs with a pessimistic explanatory style tend to blame themselves when things go wrong and see negative events as both permanent and pervasive.
    2. Those with an optimistic explanatory style view setbacks as temporary and solvable. Because they have faced challenges before, they have confidence in their ability to do it again. They see it as an opportunity to learn and grow.

    Honing your psychological resiliency can be a valuable business asset. Those with a positive explanatory style are more successful. They outperform pessimistic peers by close to 40 percent in business and sales, and also experience lower rates of illness and depression.

    READ MORE
Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career